• “Even the stones were destroyed”

    “Even the stones were destroyed”0

    Gethin Chamberlain, on the Darfur border, for The Scotsman, 15 June 2004 HALAWA’S body lay on the mountainside where she fell when the bombs exploded, her womb torn open, the tiny body of her unborn baby lying by her side, the blood soaking into the soil congealing in the heat of the sun. She was

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  • Shallow grave is testimony to Sudan’s lies

    Shallow grave is testimony to Sudan’s lies0

    Gethin Chamberlain, In Nami, North Darfur, for The Scotsman, 4 August 2004 THE grave is just a mound of earth, no more than two feet high at its peak and 10ft in diameter. It lies about 50 yards from the edge of the village of Nami in North Darfur. From the thorn tree a few

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  • South Sudan

    South Sudan0

    South Sudan became the world’s newest country in 2011 but within two years fighting had broken out between Dinka loyal to President Salva Kiir and members of the Nuer tribe, supporting former vice-president Riek Machar. A combination of violence and drought devastated last year’s harvests, creating food shortages that have left 100,000 people facing famine

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  • No food, no money: conflict and chaos as South Sudan grapples with famine

    No food, no money: conflict and chaos as South Sudan grapples with famine0

    The rains are now falling, but on a country where people cannot work their fields because of fighting and where food prices are escalating beyond their reach Gethin Chamberlain for The Guardian, 15 July 2017 The tape measure wound around the arm of two-year old Apiu tells its own story. Under the traffic light system

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  • South Sudan’s battle for cattle is forcing schoolgirls to become teenage brides

    South Sudan’s battle for cattle is forcing schoolgirls to become teenage brides0

    Conflict and desperate hunger are driving families to marry off their daughters to secure precious cows, despite the girls having to forfeit their education Gethin Chamberlain for The Guardian, 8 June 2017 Down a red dirt road on the outskirts of Rumbek, a sprawling town at the heart of the world’s youngest country, a small

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